Share our Experience of Birding and Photography
 
9 and 14 June 2011 - Phang-Nga
 
 

Kevin had visited Phuket before and had used a guide on a Phuket day trip so we decided to take him off the island to the neighbouring province of Phang Nga.

 

After a two hour drive we arrived at the forest at Ton Pariwat Wildlife Sanctuary. The birding was slower than it had been a few weeks ago but we still managed to see a few good birds. A male Crimson Sunbird showed well and a pair of Vernal Hanging Parrots flew by. We heard some Black-and-yellow Broadbills nearby and called them in. A Common Emerald Dove did its normal high speed fly by and a Crested Serpent-eagle was seen in the distance. A  Grey-breasted Spiderhunter slowly moved from flower to flower. A variety of Bulbuls, Babblers and Treeswifts made up the rest of the birds.
 
 
 
    
 Black-and-yellow Broadbill             Jungle Myna            Rufous-bellied Swallow

 

 
On the way off the hill we stopped to call in a Puff-throated Babbler. As usual we stopped at our Flowerpecker tree where Orange-bellied Flowerpeckers and Scarlet-backed Flowerpeckers were feeding. A Yellow-bellied Prinia sang for us across the road.

 

In Phang Nga Recreational Park we found a pair of Jungle Mynas feeding on the floor.  Some Rufous-bellied Swallows were flying overhead and two Blue Whistling Thrushes were at the base of the cliffs.

 

We crossed the road to the Mangrove Park and had an excellent hour. An Ashy Tailorbird landed very close to us as we walked in. Three Black-and-Red Broadbills seemed to follow us around and a pair of Mangrove Pittas sat on the railing. A Ruddy Kingfisher also came in quite close. Pied Fantail, Ashy Drongo, Oriental Magpie Robin and Olive-winged Bulbul were seen too.
 
 
     
      Black-and-Red Broadbill               Ashy Tailorbird                      Mangrove Pitta
 

 

After lunch at Ao Phang Nga NP we found a Brown-winged Kingfisher on the boardwalk.

 

The afternoon was spent at the abandoned Thai Muang Golf Course. This is usually a very good spot for birding but is never as good in the wet season as it is in the dry season as many of the birds here are only winter visitors. Nevertheless we still found some nice birds including Lesser Whistling-duck,

Blue-throated Bee-eater, River Lapwing, Black-winged Kite, Purple Heron and a pair of Plain Sunbirds.

 

As we dropped Kevin off at his hotel he was saying that he’d really enjoyed his day and might give us a call to go out again later in the week. And he did. For his second day out we decided to take him to Sri Phang Nga NP as at this time of year the Pittas are easier to find.

 

After getting up at stupid o’clock we arrived at Sri Phang Nga at 7am. We headed straight to our Hooded Pitta stakeout. Before we could get the gear out of the car we heard the unmistakable call of an Orange-breasted Trogon so we hurried down the road to call it out. No luck, it just disappeared. While walking back to the car a pair of Chestnut-naped Forktails landed on the road in front of us. At the same time, a woodpecker started calling. We recognized it as a Banded Woodpecker and soon found it working its way up a tree trunk. The Hooded Pitta flew straight past us a few times but we didn’t get to see it perching.

 

Our next bird was the first of an amazing collection of four different forest Kingfishers. We heard it calling as it flew down the river towards us and we were delighted to see a Blue-banded Kingfisher fly past us.

 

We next crossed the river to where we’d seen Banded Pitta a few weeks before. There was no response but we had good views of White-rumped Shama and Asian Paradise-flycatcher. We could hear a group of Great Hornbills on the opposite side of the river but couldn’t find them. As we came back to the car we heard the Trogon again and after a few minutes of searching, Games found it perching high up.

 

What a great start to the day. Next we moved up to the car park at the fish pool. Silver-rumped Spinetails were feeding together with Grey-rumped Treeswifts and Whiskered Treeswifts.

 

Our second kingfisher was a male Rufous-collared Kingfisher which came in and sat nicely for us.  At the start of the waterfall walk we spent a few minutes looking for Babblers. Abbott's Babbler, Black-capped Babbler and Pin-striped Tit-Babbler all showed up.  We puzzled over a rather plain but vocal bird for a while before deciding it was a Brown-cheeked Fulvetta.
 
 
 
     
    Grey-rumped Treeswift     Rufous-collared Kingfisher     Whiskered Treeswift

 

 
 
We now started our walk back along the road and picked up a variety of Bulbuls including Spectacled Bulbul, Buff-vented Bulbul and Ochraceous Bulbul.

 

During an early lunch we spotted a pair of White-rumped Munia building a nest and a Grey-headed Woodpecker calling from a large tree.

 

Our luck continued after lunch with a mixed flock including Red-throated Sunbird, Spectacled Spiderhunter and Ruby-cheeked Sunbird. The first being a very difficult bird to see in Thailand. On a trail down a side stream we had our third Kingfisher, a Blue-eared Kingfisher this time.

 

We finished up with a walk to the waterfall. A flock of six Fiery Minivets moved past us and we surprised a Lesser Fish-Eagle down on the river. On the way back Kevin spotted our last Kingfisher. A female Banded Kingfisher was sitting patiently near where we had tried to call one out earlier. This had easily been our best day’s birding at Sri Phang Nga.

 

On our way out of the park we stopped briefly next to a plantation and found a Rufescent Prinia singing in a bush and a Barred Buttonquail ran down the road in front of us. In Phuket we stopped at our Blue-winged Pitta stake-out where we called out two birds.

 

Kevin had had another good day and was kind enough to offer us some space at his stall at the Bird Fair to market Games and her company.  We will put together a leaflet and some photographs so look out for Kevin at the Malta stand.
 
 
 
     
   Ruby-cheeked Sunbird           Banded kingfisher
 
 
 
 
 
   

Ton Pariwat

 

Vernal Hanging Parrot

Germain's Swiftlet

Grey-rumped Treeswift

Whiskered Treeswift

Common Emerald Dove

Crested Serpent-eagle

Black-and-yellow Broadbill

White-rumped Shama

Black-headed Bulbul

Black-crested Bulbul

Stripe-throated Bulbul

Buff-vented Bulbul

Ochraceous Bulbul

Dark-necked Tailorbird

Abbott's Babbler

Pin-striped Tit-Babbler

Crimson Sunbird

Grey-breasted Spiderhunter

 

Phang Nga Mangroves

Ruddy Kingfisher

Brown-winged Kingfisher

Mangrove Pitta

Black-and-Red Broadbill

Pied Fantail

Ashy Drongo

Oriental Magpie Robin

Olive-winged Bulbul

Ashy Tailorbird

 

Thai Muang Golf Course

Lesser Whistling-duck

Coppersmith Barbet

White-throated Kingfisher

Blue-throated Bee-eater

Greater Coucal

Zebra Dove

Spotted Dove

White-breasted Waterhen

Grey-headed Swamphen

River Lapwing

Red-wattled Lapwing

Brahminy Kite

Black-winged Kite

Little Grebe

Little Cormorant

Little Egret

Eastern Cattle Egret

Purple Heron

Eastern Great Egret

Striated Heron

Large-billed Crow

Common Myna

White-vented Myna

Yellow-vented Bulbul

Streak-eared Bulbul

Plain Sunbird

Paddyfield Pipit

 

Sri Phang Nga

Banded Woodpecker

Grey-headed Woodpecker

Orange-breasted Trogon

Blue-eared Kingfisher

Blue-banded Kingfisher

Banded Kingfisher

Rufous-collared Kingfisher

Silver-rumped Spinetail

Grey-rumped Treeswift

Whiskered Treeswift

Hooded Pitta

Lesser Green Leafbird

Fiery Minivet

Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike

Asian Paradise-flycatcher

White-rumped Shama

Chestnut-naped Forktail

Black-crested Bulbul

Spectacled Bulbul

Buff-vented Bulbul

Ochraceous Bulbul

Streaked Bulbul

Common Tailorbird

Dark-necked Tailorbird

Abbott's Babbler

Black-capped Babbler

Pin-striped Tit-Babbler

Chestnut-winged Babbler

Brown-cheeked Fulvetta

Red-throated Sunbird

Crimson Sunbird

Little Spiderhunter

Spectacled Spiderhunter

Ruby-cheeked Sunbird

White-rumped Munia

 

Other

 

Barred Buttonquail

Oriental Pratincole

Blue-winged Pitta

Rufescent Prinia

Puff-throated Babbler

Orange-bellied Flowerpecker

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker

Yellow-bellied Prinia

Jungle Myna

Rufous-bellied Swallow

Blue Whistling Thrush
 
 
 
 
 
Miss Punjapa Phetsri (aka Games)
Site owner and guide. 
 
 
 
Orange-bellied Flowerpecker
 
 
 
Crimson Sunbird
 
 
 
Brown-winged Kingfisher
 
 
 
 Blue-throated Bee-eater
 
 
 
River Lapwing
 
 
 
Banded Woodpecker
 
 
 
White-rumped Shama
 
 
 
Asian Paradise-flycatcher
 
 
 
Spectacled Bulbul
 
 
 
Ochraceous Bulbul
 
 
Abbott's Babbler